Apple is Not Calling – iCloud ‘Hack’ Scams

iCloud iconHave you received a call from Apple Tech Support or Apple, Inc? How about an email letting you know that there has been suspicious activity on your iCloud account? Or a text message that your ID has expired or been compromised?

Let us just answer that for you: NO! You have NOT!  angry woman screaming at phone

No, we’re not watching you. We know that Apple will not call you (unless you have initiated a call from them). There is no strange activity in your iCloud or iTunes account; but there will be if you give these posers any information.

The bad news is: bad people will probably be using these same tricks on our grandkids someday. The good news is: they leave it all in your hands! The easiest way to avoid it: don’t answer, DON’T CLICK THE LINK, don’t answer the email. Enable two factor authentication; that way, if they do get your information, they still can’t get in.

If they call, we recommend just hanging up or not answering at all (again, Apple won’t be calling you unless you asked them to). Fortunately, most cell providers show the Caller ID as “Scam likely” so they’re a bit easier to spot.  These latest bold would-be thieves will even leave you a voicemail!

a-funny-kid-on-a-phoneOf course, if you’re feeling particularly feisty and have some pent up sarcasm, keeping them on the phone is a great outlet (you can waste some of their time and still be a good person, just do it with kindness; imagine the life that has brought them to this dirty work).

If they email you, move it to your spam folder and delete it. Don’t reply or open it (again, Apple will not email you unless you’ve initiated it, like a receipt or reply to an email you sent). You can also report it to the real Apple, Inc by sending an email to: reportphishing@apple.com.

If you do receive one of these calls, texts or emails, Apple has a lot of information and precautions you can take to keep your information and account safe.  kal-visuals-686507-unsplash

The scammer calls and emails are fairly easy to spot. Still, some are very official looking and sounding. The best practice, with anything that involves a log in ID and passcode is to visit the official website yourself (not clicking a link).

The bad guys get smarter, too and sometimes they’ll still get you. If you suspect identity theft, here is some useful information on spotting, stopping and reporting it.

If you haven’t received any calls or emails, but you’re getting pop-ups on your computer about viruses or other “urgent” security matters, those are FAKE too.

Want to know what’s real? The amazing service, breadth and depth of experience, low prices, lifetime repair guarantees and BIG SMILES you’ll find at TechRestore! We’re here to help.

 

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